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Cassell Street is named after The Hon. James Horatio Nelson Cassell, a collector of customs for the Victorian Government.  Originally bushland, Cassell purchased lot 33 in the early 1850s where he built “Hawksburn House” which was located on the intersection of what is now Cassell Street and Hawksburn Road.

“Hawksburn House” was a large, plain, square fronted villa with a parapet and the usual door and windows without a verandah and surrounded by a white picket fence with a carriage drive running through to Williams Ro2897_180714125118_584ad. In 1870 the frontage of “Hawksburn House” was sold off and subdivided with a new entry at Williams Road. The railway came through the area in 1879 which saw the subdivision of “Hawksburn House” into cottage and villa lots. An 1895 drainage plan of the area around the Hawksburn Railway Station it shows that the carriage way had become Cassell Street alongside the creation of Motherwell, Oban, Walter, Norman, Hobson, Howitt and other streets in the area. Interestingly, the south side of Cassell Street was not subdivided and developed until the Edwardian era of the early 20th century.

Today, Cassell Street is quiet, peaceful and full of charm, it is occupied by classic single-storey brick Victorian cottages, villas decorated with lattice work and parapets, as well as new architect-designed townhouses and apartments echoing the designs of the Victorian era.

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